Red Hat OpenShift 4 is here

Wow! This is a biggie!

So Red Hat just released OpenShift 4 with a ton of new features. I haven’t had time to try it all out yet but here are some of my favorites.

RHEL CoreOS

Well, this might actually be a post on its own. This is the first new release of CoreOS after the Red Hat aquisition and serves as the successor of both CoreOS and RHEL Atomic Host. It’s basically RHEL built for OpenShift. Kinda like how RHV uses an ostree based RHEL as well.

I love Atomic Host. The OSTree model is really neat, allowing you to really lock down the operating system and do atomic upgrades. Either it works, or you roll back. There is nothing in between. And being able to lock down the OS completely (by disabling the ostree-rpm commands) means the attack surface is greatly reduced.

What CoreOS brings to the Atomic Host in this new, merged version is greater management and a more streamlined delivery of updates, as well as tighter integration with OpenShift.

Cluster management

So, that tighter integration with OpenShift is really what’s key here. This means that you can manage the lifecycle of the hosts running Kubernetes directly from Kubernetes. OpenShift 4 also comes with a new installer that uses a bootstrap node for spinning up all neccessary virtual machine for the cluster. Running OpenShift on premise will give you the exakt sweet experience as you would get running Google Kubernetes Engine or Amazon ECS. No need to manually manage virtual machine for applying updates or scaling our or in.

Service Mesh

Next up is Service Mesh. This is Red Hats supported implementation of Istio and Jaeger, two relatively new open source projects which brings some cool new features to Kubernetes for managing that growing network complexity that you get when you move more and more stuff into the microservice model.

Getting full visibility and control over the network is a great security win and you know how we at Basalt love security. I’ll sure check out OpenShift 4 and bring it into Basalt Container Platform to get that awesome new features to our customers.

Operators

Lastly is the Operators framework. This is really a natural evolvement of packaging, deploying and managing container based services. Just as CoreOS means improved management of the hosts running under OpenShift, Operators means improved management of the services running on top of it. My bet is that we will package more and more of our turn-key services such as Basalt Log Service and Basalt Monitor Service as Operators that run on top of OpenShift.

So that’s a wrap for the biggests news in OpenShift 4. I will do a deep dive later on when I get the chance and perhaps write a more detailed article when I’ve really gotten my hands dirty with it.

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